Cognition and the Arts plus Brain Training Trials

By Amy Price PhD

This is a short video about the power of art and children and the impact of  scientifically based training on the brain.

I am grateful for the part the arts played at a critical time in my childhood when my life came undone through the death of a parent and the results of the cascade of unfortunate choices by other family members. A neighbor who was a curator in an art museum scooped me up and found me art and drama scholarships. I was never destined to become a Rembrandt but I survived as a person who realized the value of investing in others. I will never forget the power and self esteem the art restored and the kindness of the people who made a way and found a place in their hearts for me.

I recently attended a Brain Art exhibit in NYC sponsored by http://brainrevolution.org/ This org is making a way for every child to have tools to develop their minds through art and computerized brain training. It was exciting to see the children create and grow.

If you are interested in participating in a brain training trial email. This is a great opportunity to find your cognitive strengths and weaknesses. An online evaluation which has been peer reviewed and industry validated  is part of this package. See what is available by watching this ten minute video on The Mind and Its Potential  

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4 Responses to “Cognition and the Arts plus Brain Training Trials”

  1. ...john Says:

    My love of the arts came through both parents. Mom grew up near Chicago and her family was often involved in community affairs primarily the symphony and the ballet.

    My father came from rough and tumble pugilistic culture of hard drinking hard-rock miners. But he was a different child, a “drawer of pictures.” A porpoise among the buffalo. He never had any formal training, but could take any scene of mountains or animals and replicate it in pencil within hours.

    I came along with some musical talent. Started on the Accordion in the second grade; switched to Cello in third, n later was awarded two scholarships to the University of Denver where I majored in Cello/Education; then added a Master of Arts in Conducting (both choral and orchestral).

    While studying in graduate school I ran across some research that indicated that students who have had instrumental training for years, have more cognitive development in the brain between the two hemispheres. Apparently, there is something about studying music–specifically instrumental music–that aids or adds some cognitive advantages.

    Not sure what, and no, I don’t remember where the research was done. (Sorry)

    I do know that when I need some “time out,” as many first-borns or only children need frequently to recharge their batteries, I have several specific concertos, symphonies, choral works, sonatas or other works that give me the necessary R&R; rest and relaxation.

    The arts offer something additional that the sciences can’t always produce. It like lifting weights. If you lift weights that are on a track or a built in system, you get the benefit of the lifting, but if you lift free weights you add the benefit of balance to the benefit you get from lifting.

    One final note (forgive the pun), a friend of mine a voice major/choral conductor who has done considerable graduate work, shared with me that the sense of pitch is the last element to leave the brain, near death; far beyond speech and other things.

    I must go now. It’s time to study and listen to a good concerto. …john

  2. Culver Andrews Says:

    While studying in graduate school I ran across some research that indicated that students who have had instrumental training for years, have more cognitive development in the brain between the two hemispheres. Apparently, there is something about studying music–specifically instrumental music–that aids or adds some cognitive advantages.
    +1

    • empower2go Says:

      Yes The Dana foundation has done extensive research on this and it is supported by findings from Gazzaniga and Mike Posner,
      It is also useful for brain injury patients who experience corpus callosum damage. We have had good success using ABT’s The Listening Program for this


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